Connecting Wild Places

Our natural and political landscapes are rapidly changing. Climate change is affecting ecosystems across the planet, and people, plants and wildlife are beginning to feel the pressures that come from a changing environment. Prolonged droughts, severe storms, growing deserts, deforestation, habitat loss and the resulting increase in stresses on wildlife are projected to become the norm in the future.
Coho Slide

Protecting Endangered Species of the North Coast

EPIC’s advocacy efforts for restoring wild fish populations includes many years of work defending forests and headwaters that provide clean water and valuable habitat for wild fish. Now, EPIC is undertaking a new initiative to reform fish hatcheries that have operated for too long without proper oversight.
Willits Rein in Caltrans Slide

Reining in Caltrans

EPIC's "Rein in Caltrans" campaign is designed to force Caltrans to abandon some of their most egregious construction projects, and to reform the flawed decision making that allows wasteful and destructive projects to move forward.
Fire Slide Seth McKinney

Returning to a Natural Cycle of Wildfire

As a society, we must understand that fire is an essential element in maintaining healthy ecosystems. EPIC is working to form a holistic approach to wildfire management that addresses the needs of the land and the people that call it home.
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Industrial Forestry: Reforming Corporate Logging

Industrial timber giants are threatening our forests by using highly intensive forest management practices compromise the productivity and sustainability of our forestlands.  EPIC advocates for responsible forestry by tracking private logging operations to ensure that environmental standards are implemented.

Compliant Cannabis Agriculture

EPIC works with environmental organizations, business leaders, and public agencies to educate people about a suite of new laws and regulations that were recently developed to address California’s commercial medical cannabis industry. We are doing this because EPIC is a part of the community and because we see people as part of the solution. Read More »
   

Updates + News

Northern Spotted Owl Listed by Fish and Game Commission

August 26, 2016

northernspottedowl_clip_image004 By a unanimous vote, the California Fish and Game Commission listed the northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis) under the California Endangered Species Act. The Commission’s decision ended the four year review process, first initiated by the Environmental Protection Information Center’s (EPIC) petition for listing in 2012. The northern spotted owl is under siege on many fronts. Northern spotted owls are threatened with extinction by past and ongoing habitat loss, primarily to timber harvest, which can exacerbate competition from the aggressive and invasive barred owl. read more >>

 

The Importance of Exercising Transinclusive Dialogue in Environmentalist Movements

August 22, 2016

Trans-Lives-matter In light of the recent tragedy of the Orlando shootings and reoccurring attacks of the LGBTQ community, this article aims to educate how the environmentalist movement can be inclusive to LGBTQ individuals, and further ensure transinclusive dialogue through academic or non formal attempts of social and environmental sustainability. It is crucial at this point of our social and political climate to be introspective and reflective on how mainstream movements have a tendency to reflect culturally dominant ideas, and therefore exclude many of the voices that fall within the gender spectrum. read more >>

 

California’s Carbon Plan and Forest Practices

August 18, 2016

help FIGHT climate changeChanges in our global climate – as a result of emissions of carbon dioxide and other pollutants into the earth’s atmosphere from anthropogenic activities such as fossil fuel combustion and wide-spread deforestation – have been apparent to scientists and concerned citizens for several decades. In 2013, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Physical Science Basis Report concluded with a 95 percent degree of certainty that human activities are the dominant cause of global warming observed since the mid-20th century. read more >>

 

Westside Rip-off

August 3, 2016

Westside logging implementation newly constructed landing siteKSWILDThe Westside salvage logging project on the Klamath National Forest (KNF) is having more than severe ecological costs. The Forest Service forecasted making over ten million dollars in timber sale revenue. In reality, the agency brought in less than 5% of that estimate. Timber corporations paid $457,000 to log 13,000 acres in the heart of the Klamath Siskiyou bioregion, which is the equivalent of $35 per acre. read more >>

 

Headwaters Trail Stewardship Day a Success!

July 14, 2016

Trail CrewOn Sunday, June 12th, ten communities members joined EPIC staff and representatives of the BLM Headwaters Forest Reserve management for a volunteer Trail Steward Day on the South Fork Elk River Trail in the Headwaters Forest Reserve. The all-day event entailed 11 miles of hiking, a tailgate lunch session at the work site, and approximately three hours of work repairing a failing trail segment, located approximately 4.5 miles from the trailhead. read more >>

 

Public Rally Against Westside “Salvage” Logging Calls on Forest Service to “Stop Westside”

July 14, 2016

StopWestSide_brookeanderson-23Public locked out of National Forest while private companies log for $2.50 a truck load – Despite rains, about 20 people gathered at the Grider Creek Campground to protest the massive clear-cut logging plan and forest closure in the Klamath National Forest. The timber sale that will purportedly take 102 Northern Spotted Owls, possibly result in a localized extinction of coho salmon, and negatively impact salmon bearing creeks and rivers is ironically called the Westside Fire Recovery Project. read more >>

 

EPIC in Review & Annual Report

July 6, 2016

EPIC team helps save this beautiful post fire stand on the Garden Gulch trail after 2013 fires on the North Fork Salmon RiverOver the past several months EPIC has been working countless hours collaborating with citizens, advocacy groups, agencies and politicians on a variety of local, national and international issues. The list below includes letters or comments in which EPIC, alongside fellow NGO's and agencies support or oppose various proposed or existing programs, laws and acts to protect our environment. EPIC business includes the most updated independently run efforts brought on by the EPIC staff.read more >>

 

Action Alert: Help Re-open the Klamath National Forest; Broad Closures Hurt Local Communities!

July 5, 2016

Salvage LoggingAction Alert: All eyes are on the Klamath National Forest as clear cut logging continues within the Westside Project area. The damaging project subsidizes the destruction of spotted owl and salmon habitat above the Klamath River and could result in the “take” of up to 103 northern spotted owls – two percent of the species entire population. The controversial project drew a record 14,000 comments in opposition and the timber sales that were so unattractive the Forest Service reduced their price to $2.50 per log truck load. To make matters worse, Klamath National Forest has issued an unconstitutional closure order. Click here to send a message to decision-makers. read more >>

 

Documenting Bovine Degradation in Wilderness: A Call for Volunteers From the Project to Reform Public Land Grazing in Northern California

June 23, 2016

Project Volunteer Luke Ruediger surveys bank trampling and riparian shade reduction on the Silver Fork of Elliot Creek within the Siskiyou Ridge portion of Rogue-Siskiyou National ForestThis summer and fall volunteers with the Project to Reform Public Land Grazing in Northern California will again be in the field monitoring conditions on public lands where cattle and other livestock are permitted to graze. Our task will be to document with photos, measurements and field notes how the cattle are managed and the resulting degradation of water quality, riparian and wetland habitats. read more >>

 

Fences Finally Removed in Tolowa Dunes State Park

June 23, 2016

ElkAfter years of assessment, documentation, mapping and planning, abandoned livestock fences in the Tolowa Dunes have finally been removed, and now a small heard of wild elk have been sighted in the area that was previously leased for cattle grazing. The Park is used as a Pacific flyway stopover for migratory birds, serves as critical rearing habitat for juvenile salmon and provides grazing opportunities for wild ungulates. Tolowa Dunes State Park is also sacred to the Tolowa people, who once had a village there, a village that was the site of a horrible massacre of the Tolowa people in 1853. read more >>

 
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