Connecting Wild Places

Our natural and political landscapes are rapidly changing. Climate change is affecting ecosystems across the planet, and people, plants and wildlife are beginning to feel the pressures that come from a changing environment. Prolonged droughts, severe storms, growing deserts, deforestation, habitat loss and the resulting increase in stresses on wildlife are projected to become the norm in the future.
Coho Slide

Protecting Endangered Species of the North Coast

EPIC’s advocacy efforts for restoring wild fish populations includes many years of work defending forests and headwaters that provide clean water and valuable habitat for wild fish. Now, EPIC is undertaking a new initiative to reform fish hatcheries that have operated for too long without proper oversight.
Willits Rein in Caltrans Slide

Reining in Caltrans

EPIC's "Rein in Caltrans" campaign is designed to force Caltrans to abandon some of their most egregious construction projects, and to reform the flawed decision making that allows wasteful and destructive projects to move forward.
Fire Slide Seth McKinney

Returning to a Natural Cycle of Wildfire

As a society, we must understand that fire is an essential element in maintaining healthy ecosystems. EPIC is working to form a holistic approach to wildfire management that addresses the needs of the land and the people that call it home.
GDslideshow.littleriver.mcrk

Industrial Forestry: Reforming Corporate Logging

Industrial timber giants are threatening our forests by using highly intensive forest management practices compromise the productivity and sustainability of our forestlands.  EPIC advocates for responsible forestry by tracking private logging operations to ensure that environmental standards are implemented.

What is Pollution Pot

Unsustainable, environmentally destructive, industrial-sized cannabis agriculture that puts the environment, the economy, and future generations at risk. These practices must come to an end, and responsible operations that promote the restoration of our watersheds must become the norm.
   

Updates + News

State Wildlife Action Plan Update & Alert

June 22, 2015

Photo Credit: USFWSTake Action: Advocate for a strong conservation legacy of California’s imperiled wildlife by asking the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) to prioritize the protection of species in the North Coast Klamath Province and Pacific Northwest conifer forests. CDFW is updating the State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP). The public review and comment period on the draft is open until July 2, 2015. California is the wildlife state, harboring more species and endemic plants and animals than any other state in the nation and it is the most populous, which makes this plan no small task. read more >>

 

State of Elk River—Cumulative Impacts, Contemporary Challenges

June 22, 2015

Flooding at Elk River Road by Angela TellezIt is said that those whom forget history are doomed to repeat it. When it comes to the Elk River watershed, located just south of Eureka, in Humboldt County, California, perhaps the saying should read “those whom forget history are doomed to exacerbate its effects.” Over 150 years of intensive forestland management in the Elk River watershed have profoundly changed the landscape, and left behind a legacy that continues to confound contemporary forest policy debate. read more >>

 

Northwest Forest Plan at 20: It’s Working!

June 22, 2015

Fig3The Northwest Forest Plan is working according to schedule. Like a fine wine, the Plan predicted our forests would get better with age; as forests that were cut in the 20th century eventually matured, the landscape would slowly regrow beautiful and bountiful old forests. In the 20 years that the Plan has been in place, our federal forests have recruited new old-growth habitat and have dramatically slowed the loss of high-quality habitat. And while losses still outnumber gains, according to the Plan, we should begin to see net gains in old-growth forests by mid-century. read more >>

 

Last Chance Grade: Looking at Alternatives

June 8, 2015

Last Chance Grade“Last Chance Grade” is a stretch of Highway 101 that sits precariously high above the Pacific Ocean and experiences frequent landslides due to the geological instability of the area. Caltrans is considering possible alternatives and reroutes that would take the road along an inland path to the east through coastal scrub, riparian and young, mature and old-growth forests within the Del Norte Coast State and National Park boundaries. read more >>

 

Defending the Pacific Northwest Protects the Planet

June 5, 2015

USFWS FLICKRBig, old trees are our local solution to global climate change. The Northwest Forest Plan, the landscape-level plan for our federal forests in the Pacific Northwest, not only protects local wildlife, water quality, and recreation, but also helps our forests act as a climate buffer, slowing the impact of global climate change. read more >>

 

Fish Kill Likely on the Klamath: A Guide to Reporting Fish Health

June 5, 2015

KFHAT Readiness IndicatorData released by the California/Nevada Fish Health Center showed that as of April 30th of this year, 100% of out-migrating juvenile salmon trapped in the main stem of the Klamath River were infected with Ceratomyxa shasta, a lethal parasite that infects salmon intestinal tracts. Based on this data, the Klamath Fish Health Assessment Team has raised current fish health readiness levels to Orange for the mainstem of the Klamath River from Iron Gate Dam to Weitchpec, which means that a kill is likely to occur and management levels in agencies need to be alerted. read more >>

 

2014 Annual Report

June 4, 2015

AR 2014CoverThe Environmental Protection Information Center is proud to present to you our 2014 Annual Report. The report includes an overview of some of our major accomplishments from last year, and a vision for what we plan to do in the coming years. In 2014 we had many victories: we protected ancient redwoods in Richardson Grove, saved northern spotted owl habitat, successfully listed the gray wolf under the California Endangered Species Act, launched a successful campaign that banned super toxic rat poison and more. read more >>

 

California Endangered Species Act Protection Sought for Nearly Extinct Humboldt Marten

June 1, 2015

Marten2ThumbnailThe Environmental Protection Information Center and the Center for Biological Diversity petitioned the California Fish and Game Commission to protect the Humboldt marten under the California Endangered Species Act today. The Humboldt marten is a cat-sized carnivore related to minks and otters that lives in old-growth forests in Northern California and southern Oregon. Most of the marten’s forest habitat has been destroyed by logging, and the remaining martens in California likely number fewer than 100 individuals. read more >>

 

Guide to Groundtruthing the Westside Timber Sale

May 21, 2015

Grieder Creek watershed is targeted in the Westside Project- Unit 535. Photo courtesy of Felice PaceWe need your help. We encourage you to see for yourself what the Klamath National Forest is proposing in one of the most biologically significant and diverse temperate forests in the world. By documenting the precious areas at risk or by investigating whether the Forest Service is keeping its word, a forest-defense technique called “groundtruthing,” you can save forests from being clearcut. read more >>

 

Keeping California Wild

May 21, 2015

Photo by Kimberly BakerEPIC has been talking a lot about the revisions to the Northwest Forest Plan. The Northwest Forest Plan is the governing document for all national forests in the Pacific Northwest and it is undergoing major revisions. This is one of our best opportunities in 20 years to critically affect National Forest management. read more >>

 
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