EPIC Unveils New Strategic Plan


Headwaters

For nearly four-decades EPIC has held public agencies accountable by upholding environmental laws to protect Northwest California’s native biodiversity. EPIC filed more than 70 lawsuits on behalf of imperiled wildlife species and their habitat, many of which led to the permanent protection of some of the region’s most biologically significant, carbon dense, intact ancient forests.

Building off our past accomplishments and holding true to our principals, we concluded that the most effective thing we can do is focus our energy and resources on achieving three specific goals: (1) Connecting working and wild forests; (2) Ensuring best management of public forestland; and (3) Ensuring best management of private industrial forests. This is not a strategy to do less; it is a strategy to be more focused, rigorous and stable.

EPIC advocates for the science-based protection and restoration of Northwest California’s forests.


NW Ca Biodiversity 2reduced

Biodiversity and the resilience of the environment are deeply intertwined.

There is an urgent need to identify new conservation areas—areas that can provide refuge from climate change, corridors of habitat that allow species to migrate and areas where habitat restoration can promote species and ecosystem resiliency to, and adaptation of climate change.

The following are EPIC’s Conservation-advocacy Goals and a forecast of our strategies and campaigns for the coming year of 2015:

Connecting Working and Wild Forests


Corridor Map North Coast

Identify, name and develop site “campaigns” for each of 13+ high priority areas on National forestland;

Collaborate with conservation allies, including tribal representatives;

Locate pressure points that will leverage cooperation of private industrial timber companies Green Diamond and Humboldt Redwood Company in wildlife corridor identification; and