Send a Letter for Spring Chinook Salmon

By
Thursday, May 26th, 2011

The Klamath and Trinity River system was once the third-largest producer of salmon and steelhead on the West Coast, but now produces fewer and fewer wild fish as a result of antiquated dams, habitat degradation and massive water withdrawals.  Dams and dewatering have made hundreds of miles of spawning habitat inaccessible or unusable. As the National Marine Fisheries Service (“NMFS”) considers listing the Chinook salmon, the agency must use the best available science.  Importantly, political and economic arguments may not influence the decision to list the species.

Please take a moment to support the recovery of wild spring Chinook salmon in the Klamath Basin, by writing the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). – Comments close June 13th.

The agency has been reviewing the status of the fish after registering a positive “90 day finding”, the first step to listing the Upper Klamath-Trinity Chinook salmon under the federal Endangered Species Act. The agency has the power to make a real difference for these fish, by acting swiftly and decisively for the recovery of this species.

Nearly ten years after the horrific 2002 fish kill on the Klamath that resulted in tens of thousands of dead salmon washing up on the river bar, a tremendous effort by local river communities, Tribal governments and environmental organizations has emerged to improve conditions for the fish. While complex negotiations, litigation and legislative strategies are on going, the fish continue to face grave threats.

Now marks an opportunity for people concerned about salmon to tell the agency representative why you think these salmon need protections offered under the Endangered Species Act. To send a letter, click here.

Links to relevant documents:

Federal Register Positive 90-day Finding on Petition to List Chinook Salmon

Petition to List Upper Klamath Chinook Salmon as a Threatened or Endangered Species

Klamath River Expert Panel – Scientific Assessment of Two Dam Removal Alternatives on Chinook Salmon –  Draft Report