Help Stop “Salvage” Logging in the Kangaroo Roadless Area

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Sunday, November 25th, 2012

UPDATE: January 30, 2013

Public Input Works. By taking action late last year with EPIC to oppose salvage logging proposed after last summer’s Goff Fire in the Klamath NF near the Oregon border, you have saved wild forests from unnecessary and damaging post-fire logging. The Klamath National Forest has cancelled plans to heavily log the Kangaroo Roadless Area! The Forest Service changed course because-

Goff Fire

 

1) Helicopter logging was not economically viable;

 

2) Klamath NF Fire staff said that post-fire logging would not improve firefighter or community safety; and

3) the Forest Service had heard from enough people that value the Kangaroo Roadless Area to realize there was nothing collaborative about a “salvage” proposal.

Now, land/ mangers will be concentrating on fuels reduction 500 feet around private properties and roadside hazard tree logging. Because a formal proposal is not yet finalized, EPIC will continue to follow the Klamath National Forest post-fire projects related to the Goff fire closely.

November 25, 2012

Click here to take Action! The Kangaroo Roadless Area outside the Red Buttes Wilderness is in danger.  This backcountry forest is one of the largest intact wild lands in California.  It provides critical connectivity for wildlife and is a virtual hotspot for biodiversity and endemic species.  It hosts waterfalls, high mountain meadows, lush old-growth forests, endless wildflowers and amazing vistas from the Pacific Crest Trail.

This summer the 22,000 acre Goff Fire burned exquisitely with a vast majority of the flames burning low to the ground cleaning the forest floor in its path. Now that the smoke has cleared, the Klamath National Forest is considering helicopter logging the biggest old-growth snags (burned trees) in the name of “forest health”.

Please Act Now and tell the Klamath National Forest to forgo logging in backcountry roadless areas and that you value rare and biologically rich post-fire habitats.