Posts by Rob DiPerna

EPIC Hike to Lady Bird Johnson Grove – Sunday, April 2nd

Tuesday, March 7th, 2017
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Register Now! EPIC’s spring/summer 2017 Redwood Parks hike series kicks off on Sunday, April 2nd, with a relatively short and leisurely hike in the picturesque Lady Bird Johnson Grove, one of the crowned jewels of Redwood National Park. The Lady Bird Johnson Grove Nature Loop Trail is only a half-mile hike on a flat, well-maintained trail and designed to be accessible to almost anyone. It is a perfect way to get a taste of what it’s like to be in an old-growth coastal redwood forest.


EPIC Speaks up for Northwest California Forests

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2017
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rob-air-resources-boardEPIC’s California Forest and Wildlife Advocate made the trip down to the Central Valley to be present in the halls of Sacramento politics and decision-making last week, to represent the voice of Northwest California’s forests. On Thursday, February 16, Rob spent the day at the California Environmental Protection Agency building in downtown Sacramento, attending a meeting of the California Air Resources Board, and an inter-agency workshop on the Draft California Forest Carbon Plan.


Speak Up for the Future of California’s Forests

Wednesday, February 8th, 2017
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tall-trees-trail-rdTake Action: California’s forests aren’t what they used to be. Since the early days of European contact and settlement, destructive logging of our old-growth forests, combined with forest fragmentation, fire exclusion, and conversion of once-diverse native forests to over-dense, under-developed plantations have left much of California’s forests in a state of disrepair.


State Initiates Pilot Watershed Study of Timber Harvest Plan Process

Monday, January 9th, 2017
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campbellcreek_bwThe State of California has initiated the first of three planning watershed-scale pilot studies to evaluate the adequacy utility, and methods of representation and assessment of information that informs the modern-day Timber Harvest Plan review process. The Campbell Creek Planning Watershed Pilot Project is a subsidiary to the larger Timber Regulation and Forest Restoration Program.


Water Board Buckles under Pressure in Fight to Protect Elk River

Tuesday, December 6th, 2016
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Elk River FloodingAlthough the dust is still settling from the eight hours of hearing in Eureka last week, it is clear that the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board members chose to defer to acquiesce to pressure from Humboldt Redwood Company and CAL FIRE instead of protecting, people, property, and water quality in Upper Elk River. The Regional Board, after months of delay, finally acted to adopt a new water quality control permit for Humboldt Redwood Company’s timber operations in the Upper Elk River watershed last week, but the product approved represents a gutted shell of the proposal that was originally brought for by staff earlier this year.


EPIC Secures Victory for Clean Water in Elk River

Wednesday, November 16th, 2016
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Elk River flowing over road. Photo courtesy of Elk River Residents AssociationAnother EPIC victory in court! A Sonoma County Superior Court judge sided with clean water and good government last week in dismissing a lawsuit brought by Humboldt Redwood Company’s lawsuit against the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board over a disputed Timber Harvest Plan water quality permit enrollment in the heavily impacted Elk River watershed. EPIC and the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Association intervened in the lawsuit on behalf of the Regional Water Board in order to support the ability of the Board to exercise its independent authority under the California Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act.


California’s Forests and Global Climate Change—Changing the Game

Thursday, October 27th, 2016
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California’s forests can help us fight climate change— if we let them. By recognizing the value of healthy, intact forests, we can use regulations and incentives to invest in the preservation and restoration of our forests—not only curbing climate change, but preserving clean air and water while protecting and restoring native habitat and biodiversity.


Climate Change, California’s Forest Carbon Plan, and the “Point of No Return”

Thursday, October 6th, 2016
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Clearcut logging in the Westside Timber SaleAs the calendar turns to October 2016, global climate change scientists have recently announced that atmospheric carbon dioxide content levels have now officially surpassed 400 parts-per-million, a threshold scientists have dubbed, “the point of no return.” Scientists say our planet has entered into a new epoch in global history, called the Anthropocene, or the, “Age of Man,” in which human-induced changes to the physical environment and natural world are so extreme that we have now surpassed the point when we can reasonably correct or fully undo the damage to our planet and its vital ecological life-support systems.


Headwaters Forest Reserve, Home, at Last

Tuesday, September 20th, 2016
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Headwaters Forest Reserve 20 Anniversary HikeFormer U.S. President, and patriarch of American Wilderness, Theodore Roosevelt, said, “Believe that you can do something and you are half way there.” On a recent Saturday, seventeen-and-a-half years after the Headwaters Forest Reserve was established as a part of the BLM National Conservation Lands system, I had the distinct honor of guiding a group of individuals who had fought hard to save this place from the saw. This was the very first hike ever into Headwaters for some of the 50 hikers who had spearheaded the Campaign to Save Headwaters Forest from 1986-1999.


Remembering the Campaign to Save Headwaters Forest

Tuesday, September 13th, 2016
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Visionary Grove Headwaters Tom & NatalynneThe year 2016 marks the 30th anniversary of the beginning of the citizen-lead campaign to Save Headwaters Forest, which was, at the time, the last significant old-growth redwood forest left unprotected on private forestlands in the world. Today, the 7,750-acre Headwaters Forest Reserve, located just south-east of Eureka, stands as a testament to the commitment, dedication, and visionary spirit of the thousands of every-day people who came to Humboldt County, California from all over the country and the world to protect the last remaining unprotected old-growth redwood forests in a struggle that spanned two decades.


California’s Carbon Plan and Forest Practices

Thursday, August 18th, 2016
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help FIGHT climate changeChanges in our global climate – as a result of emissions of carbon dioxide and other pollutants into the earth’s atmosphere from anthropogenic activities such as fossil fuel combustion and wide-spread deforestation – have been apparent to scientists and concerned citizens for several decades. In 2013, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Physical Science Basis Report concluded with a 95 percent degree of certainty that human activities are the dominant cause of global warming observed since the mid-20th century.


Headwaters Trail Stewardship Day a Success!

Thursday, July 14th, 2016
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Trail CrewOn Sunday, June 12th, ten communities members joined EPIC staff and representatives of the BLM Headwaters Forest Reserve management for a volunteer Trail Steward Day on the South Fork Elk River Trail in the Headwaters Forest Reserve. The all-day event entailed 11 miles of hiking, a tailgate lunch session at the work site, and approximately three hours of work repairing a failing trail segment, located approximately 4.5 miles from the trailhead.


Taking Stock, Taking Cover—Redwood Restoration, Reconnection, and the Humboldt Marten

Thursday, June 23rd, 2016
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The coast redwood forests of Northern California are often perceived as a remnant of paleo-history, a land, and a place seemingly lost in time, and sheltered from the modern age by the pale shadow of the redwood curtain. For many across the country and the world, the coast redwood forests are a dark, impenetrable, and primeval place, where one may at once be lost, and found.


Elk River Update—Deciding to Decide

Tuesday, May 24th, 2016
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Elk River flowing over road. Photo courtesy of Elk River Residents AssociationDecisions, decisions, decisions…It has happened to all of us, surely, at one time or another. It can seem so complicated to make even the most basic of decisions, at times. We can talk ourselves into a state of paralysis, turning over the relative merits of one choice over another. In the end though, regardless of how much we debate, we eventually have to make decisions and live with the consequences.


EPIC Redwoods Spring/Summer Hikes 2016

Monday, May 23rd, 2016
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Salmon Pass Trail Headwaters Reserve RDCome out and join the staff of the Environmental Protection Information Center—(EPIC), for a series of spring and summer excursions in our majestic and critically-important redwood region parks and reserves, home of the tallest trees on earth. Hikes will be led by EPIC staff, and are free and open to the public. Topics to be covered will include the ecology, sociology, history, management, protection, and conservation of our public parks and reserves in the redwood region of Humboldt and Del Norte Counties.


Fish and Game Commission Delays Spotted Owl Listing Decision

Monday, April 25th, 2016
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northern-spotted-owls-USFWSThe California Fish and Game Commission, the regulatory body responsible for administration of the California Endangered Species Act, has decided to delay its decision on whether or not listing the northern spotted owl is warranted until its next regularly scheduled meeting, to be convened in June, in Bakersfield.


Environmental Groups Move to Intervene in Elk River Water Quality Lawsuit

Tuesday, March 15th, 2016
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Elk River Flooding EPIC, the Pacific Coast Federation of Fisherman’s Association (PCFFA), and the Institute for Fisheries Resources (IFR), filed paperwork this week to intervene in a lawsuit to defend clean water from logging pollution. EPIC and allies seek to defend the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board’s May 20, 2015 decision to not authorize discharges of sediment and other associated waste into waters of the Elk River watershed from logging operations under Humboldt Redwood Company “McCloud Shaw” Timber Harvest Plan (1-12-110HUM).


Show Your Support for the Northern Spotted Owl

Monday, March 14th, 2016
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NSO fem&juv _0397Take Action Now: California’s northern spotted owls are at the brink of extinction. Ongoing habitat loss, competition from invasive barred owls, impacts from cannabis agriculture and exposure to rodenticides, impacts from wildfire, fire suppression, and post-fire logging, changing temperature and weather patterns resulting from global and localized climate change, and the inadequacy of existing regulatory mechanisms all contribute to the declining populations of northern spotted owls. Tell the Fish and Game Commission to Protect the Northern Spotted Owl.


Who’ll Stand Up for the Northern Spotted Owl?

Thursday, February 25th, 2016
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Owl Self-Defense wings shadowFrom way back in time immemorial, a time long-lost in the annals of natural history, the northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina), has developed a highly specialized and remarkable niche in the moist primal forests of the redwood coast, the Klamath-Siskiyou Bioregion, and up and down the temperate rainforests of the Pacific Northwest. The northern spotted owl is an apex nocturnal forest predator that has evolved into a highly-refined specialist, occupying the deep, dark, dense, and dank forests along the rugged pacific coastline, feeding on small mammals, rearing its young, and helping to maintain the delicate balance of our forest ecosystems.


Latest Study Shows Northern Spotted Owl Populations in Rapid Decline

Monday, December 14th, 2015
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NSO babyThe northern spotted owl is in decline across its entire range and its rate of decline is increasing—that is the conclusion of a major demographic study produced by federal scientists, published Wednesday, December 9, 2015, in the journal “The Condor.” The study examined survey results from monitoring areas across the range of the imperiled owl, and results suggest that immediate and aggressive improvements in existing conservation efforts will be necessary if the owl is to persist in the wild.