Posts by Kimberly Baker

Stop Mendocino National Forest Clearcutting!!!

Thursday, October 19th, 2017
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Take Action Now: The Mendocino National Forest is proposing roughly 1,000 acres of even-aged logging – basically clearcutting – in the headwaters of Grindstone Creek. This includes; green tree retention, group selection, overstory removal and shelterwood seed cut. Green tree retention removes 85% of the trees, group selection equates to mini-clearcuts, overstory removal cuts all the big trees and leaves the smaller ones and shelterwood leaves a few large trees to provide a future seed source.


Tipping the Scales

Wednesday, August 23rd, 2017
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EPIC recently submitted an objection to the Horse Creek Project— 1,700 acres of post-fire clearcutting in the 2016 Gap Fire footprint. An administrative objection is the way to formally challenge a Forest Service project, prior to litigation. Our lawsuit against the Klamath National Forest, for clearcutting nearly 10,000 acres after the 2014 Westside Fires, has yet to be heard in Federal Court. Both of these timber sales expect to kill or adversely harm salmon and their essential fish habitat.


Welcome California’s Newest Wolf Family: The Lassen Pack!

Tuesday, July 11th, 2017
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Northern California just got a little more wild! Biologists surveying the Lassen National Forests have confirmed California’s second wolf pack. An adult couple made a showing in Lassen county last fall. They now have a family of at least three pups born this spring residing in Lassen National Forest and adjacent private lands.


Wolves of the Golden State

Thursday, May 18th, 2017
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For the first time since 1924, wild wolves are roaming California. Below are the wolves who call (or have called) our state home. OR-7, also known as Journey was born into the Imnaha Pack in 2009. He was the first confirmed wolf in the Golden State in nearly 100 years. In 2011 and 2012 he roamed over 4000 miles before eventually finding a mate and establishing a territory in southern Oregon in 2013. He had his first pups in 2014 just across the border in the Rouge-Siskiyou National Forest. His pack remains there and continues to grow, having a successful litter four years in a row.


A Restoration Story Unfolds: The Somes Bar Integrated Fire Management Project

Wednesday, March 8th, 2017
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The Somes Bar project on the Six Rivers National Forest is a demonstration of true collaboration. It is the first pilot project born from years of working together in the Western Klamath Restoration Partnership (WKRP or Partnership), which includes the Karuk Tribe, local fire safe and watershed councils, the US Forest Service, local landowners, the Pacific Southwest Research Station, EPIC and other organizations. WKRP is working proactively on restoring fire, habitat and cultural practices within 1.2 million acres of the Mid Klamath River watersheds.


Gap Fire Report

Tuesday, January 17th, 2017
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gap-fire-courtesy-of-luke-ruedigerWith recent snow on the ground, wildfire remains to be a hot topic. Headlines hype fire hysteria during summer months but no attention is paid to the extreme consequences of fire fighting. The necessary and beneficial effects to our forest ecosystems go unnoticed while a million dollars a day is being spent on putting them out. The monetary costs are easy to equate but the ecological costs are rarely publicized. To shed light on what takes place during and after a fire event, Luke Ruediger has put together a report of the Gap Fire that burned this summer on the Klamath National Forest.


Three Victories for the Crown and Coast of California!

Tuesday, January 17th, 2017
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mark-harrisThe Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument is expanded to 100,000 acres! Before leaving office, President Obama added 48,000 acres to the monument, which lies mostly in southwestern Oregon and now includes 5,000 acres in Northern California. The expansion will provide vital habitat connectivity and added landscape scale protection. The convergence of three geologically distinct mountain ranges, the Cascade, Klamath, and Siskiyous, has created a truly unique landscape, home to many rare and endemic plants and animals. It is the first monument set aside solely for the preservation of biodiversity.


Wild Horses of Modoc National Forest

Tuesday, November 1st, 2016
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yound_stallionsIn late September the Modoc National Forest conducted a six-day helicopter roundup and captured 290 wild horses. The mustangs were gathered mainly from adjacent private land, Pit River Tribal land, but also within the boundary of the territory. The roundups started in the early morning to avoid running the horses down in the afternoon heat. Multiple sweeps would happen each day, brining in anywhere between 5-40 mustangs at a time.


Leave A Legacy! Westside – Old Growth and Implementation

Tuesday, September 13th, 2016
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DSC00534The Klamath National Forest repeatedly stated in its Westside documents that all legacy trees would be kept standing. From what we have seen, KNF has been cutting and removing these biological legacies at a rapid pace and more are threatened. Legacy trees, i.e. old growth snags and live trees are defined as disproportionately large diameter trees that are often remnants of the previous stand on a given site. They are old standing trees that have persisted on the landscape after man-made and natural disturbances.


Westside Rip-off

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2016
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Westside logging implementation newly constructed landing siteKSWILDThe Westside salvage logging project on the Klamath National Forest (KNF) is having more than severe ecological costs. The Forest Service forecasted making over ten million dollars in timber sale revenue. In reality, the agency brought in less than 5% of that estimate. Timber corporations paid $457,000 to log 13,000 acres in the heart of the Klamath Siskiyou bioregion, which is the equivalent of $35 per acre.


New California Wolf Pack

Thursday, August 20th, 2015
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California Wolf Pups 1-jpgThe Shasta Pack of Northern California is a family of seven gray wolves, two adults and five pups! The California Department of Fish and Wildlife just released photos of the pack, which are all dark in color. The pups appear to be a few months old and approximately 35-40 pounds. The Department had set up additional trail cameras after earlier photographs recorded a single canid in May and July. More photographs and video of the Shasta Pack are expected next week.


Take Action: Klamath River Runs Brown!

Tuesday, July 21st, 2015
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Klamath River Near Mouth 7.13.15 by Mark Harris Take Action Now to stop Westside: A few short but intense rain storms hit the 2014 fire areas on the Klamath National Forest causing massive sediment events that turned the mighty Klamath and Salmon River systems muddy and brown. On July 5, 7 and 12 rainstorms brought over an inch of rain in less than an hour causing road damage, intense debris torrents with slurries of mud, rock, water and trees to sliding for miles, filling in pools and creeks that serve as some of the best salmon spawning habitat. These watersheds are located within the same steep and unstable hillsides that are targeted for logging in the Westside project.


State Wildlife Action Plan Update & Alert

Monday, June 22nd, 2015
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Photo Credit: USFWSTake Action: Advocate for a strong conservation legacy of California’s imperiled wildlife by asking the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) to prioritize the protection of species in the North Coast Klamath Province and Pacific Northwest conifer forests. CDFW is updating the State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP). The public review and comment period on the draft is open until July 2, 2015. California is the wildlife state, harboring more species and endemic plants and animals than any other state in the nation and it is the most populous, which makes this plan no small task.


The Westside Story

Wednesday, April 15th, 2015
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Whites Russian Fire Take Action Now: Say no to a logging tragedy! The heart of Klamath-Siskiyou bioregion could lose 30,000 acres of prime snag forest habitat on the steepest of unstable slopes above vital wild salmon rivers. Late Successional Reserves, meadows, seventy-five watersheds and the Caroline Creek eagles, bumblebees, endemic salamanders, Pacific fisher and seventy threatened Northern spotted owls need your help. The Westside situation is perilous, learn the details of the project.


Sign Petition to Stop Westside – One of the Largest Timber Sales in US History!

Wednesday, March 25th, 2015
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westside photoClick here to take action now. The Klamath National Forest is proposing one of the largest timber sales in US history! Over 30,000 acres of post fire habitat are at risk of elimination. These steep and rugged watersheds support the most productive wild salmon and steelhead fisheries outside of Alaska, the largest acreage of unprotected low elevation ancient wild forest remaining on the West Coast, a high concentration of Wild and Scenic rivers and are world renowned for their rich biodiversity with many rare and endemic native species.


Advocate for Real Recovery

Wednesday, November 12th, 2014
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1Take Action: The Klamath National Forest recently proposed a massive post-fire logging operation throughout some of the most important watersheds on the north coast. The Westside project targets up to 43,338 acres concentrated in Late-Successional Reserves (old forests), Riparian Reserves (streamside forests), in Wild and Scenic River corridors and within Northern spotted owl critical habitat.


Jess Say No—Take Action to Save Forest Canopy and Wildlife Trees

Monday, November 10th, 2014
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unnamedTake Action: The Jess timber sale would remove vast amounts of forest canopy, disturb riparian reserves and targets old growth and mature wildlife trees within Critical Habitat for the Northern spotted owl. The project would cut nearly 1,000 acres of north facing slopes within the North Fork Salmon River watershed on the Klamath National Forest, adding to the cumulative effects of 45,000 acres of wildfire, extreme impacts from firefighting and post-fire logging from the 2013 Salmon Complex Fire.


Klamath Chainsaw Masacre

Wednesday, October 29th, 2014
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IMG_1337The Klamath National Forest has been going batty eliminating wildlife habitat and damaging sensitive post fire soils on one of the most important rivers for salmon fisheries on the north coast. While EPIC was able to get some of the best wildlife habitat protected, acres of post-fire logging continues on the North Fork Salmon River. Wet weather has not stopped the large heavy equipment from operating on these steep slopes, and mitigation measures for protecting wildlife and watershed values have not been completed or implemented, resulting in horrific impacts to water quality and sensitive habitat areas.


50 Years Wild: Connecting Wild Places

Tuesday, September 2nd, 2014
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sawtoothpeakAmerica’s landmark Wilderness Act turns 50 today! As we take time to celebrate what has been accomplished over the years, it is also important to consider what still needs to be done. Through years of environmental advocacy work in the Pacific Northwest and reviewing current science, we have learned that in this rapidly changing climate, the best thing we can do is protect all remaining old growth and mature trees, and establish a well-connected network of wildlife corridors.


Victory: Wildlife Habitat Protected

Thursday, August 21st, 2014
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GardenGulchCritical habitat and old-growth reserves saved from post-fire “salvage” on the Wild and Scenic North Fork Salmon River! EPIC and allies, successfully stopped logging in some of the best habitat proposed in the Salmon Salvage timber sale. Our efforts ultimately resulted in the elimination of larger stands of “salvage” and a renewed focus on roadside hazard treatments. This is great news for naturally recovering forests.