Archive for January, 2017

Action Alert: Say No to Climate Denier and Yes to Science

Monday, January 30th, 2017
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Trump Chooses Climate Change Denier to Head Department of Agriculture

Take Action to stop climate change denier from taking cabinet position. On January 19th, Donald Trump selected conservative Republican and climate change denier, Sonny Perdue, to be his Secretary of Agriculture. In 2014, Perdue wrote an opinion article describing climate change as “…a running joke among the public, and liberals have lost all credibility when it comes to climate science because their arguments have become so ridiculous and so obviously disconnected from reality.”

If confirmed, Mr. Perdue would be the head U.S. Department of Agriculture, an agency with a $155 billion budget that is charged with oversight of our national forests and grasslands, which make up 279,000 square miles of public lands. Additionally, he is tasked with matters relating to Wildlife Services, overseeing farm policy, food safety, and the food-stamp program.

The former governor of Georgia who once ran a grain and fertilizer business, has received hundreds of thousands of dollars in federal farm subsidies that help chemical companies and large agriculture conglomerates at the expense of the environment and small farmers. As governor, Perdue championed the expansion of factory farms and pushed against gas taxes and EPA efforts to enforce the Clean Air Act.

Perdue’s nomination must now be vetted by the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry, which will examine Perdue and vote on whether or not to recommend him for confirmation by the Senate.

Click here to take Action now to ask your Senator to ensure that climate change deniers like Perdue are not confirmed leading roles in our government.

 


Keep California Great!

Thursday, January 26th, 2017
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img_4386California did not exist at the founding of our country, but we are the future of America.

Look: we are going to experience losses at the federal level. Since our federal environmental laws were passed, they have been chipped away at; now, they be wiped off the books entirely. We can no longer rely on federal environmental law to protect the clean air and water, biodiversity, and ecosystem health that we need and cherish.

Now is time for California to take charge and ensure that our state environmental laws are strong enough to keep California great.

EPIC calls on the Legislature to review and revise California’s foundational environmental laws—the California Endangered Species Act, the California Environmental Quality Act, and the Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act, among others—to ensure that we have a safe and healthy California, for all its residents (both humans and critters alike).

California has led the nation before in setting environmental policy. California was among the first to move to protect biodiversity, passing the California Endangered Species Act in 1970, three years before the federal Endangered Species Act. Before the creation of the U.S. Forest Service, California recognized the public importance of our forests and charged the Board of Forestry, first founded in 1885, with the enforcement of forestry laws.

What we do in California has an outsized importance not just in our country, but around the globe. If it were its own country, California would boast the 6th largest economy in the world—ahead of France and just below Great Britain. Our laws can help shape federal environmental policy, even if they only apply within our own state.

EPIC is heartened to hear that Governor Brown has pledged to take up the slack left by the Trump administration and join with other states and countries to fight climate change and the declaration by California Senate President pro Tempore Kevin de León and California Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon that California will “set an example for other states to follow.


EPIC Changes Ahead

Tuesday, January 24th, 2017
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salmon-river-asEPIC things are in store for us in 2017. (Pun intended.) This year EPIC celebrates its 40th anniversary—and as with any mark of a new era, big changes are to come! All year long we will be celebrating our work to protect and restore North Coast forests and waters, and connect more people with nature by highlighting our successes and how they inspire us as we plan for the future.

At the end of February, we will say goodbye to Natalynne DeLapp-Hinton, EPIC’s Executive Director since 2014. We are pleased to introduce a new face, Briana Villalobos as the Director of Communications and Development, and welcome current Program Director Tom Wheeler J.D. as EPIC’s new Executive Director.

While Natalynne will be leaving us this year, her impact on the community and all things EPIC will stay with us. During her time as the Executive Director, Natalynne built upon EPIC’s strong brand as California’s North Coast forest protection organization, all while centralizing EPIC’S strengths as an operationally and strategically focused powerhouse. Her unconventional and bold strategies have introduced a collaborative and principled standard of communication that sought to build bridges and work within the community to find pragmatic yet idealistic solutions.

Natalynne in HeadwatersNatalynne worked her way up from the bottom, starting first with EPIC as a volunteer in 2008, then upon graduation from Humboldt State University in 2009, she was hired as a Policy Advocate traveling to and from Board of Forestry meetings in Sacramento. In 2011 she took on the role of Development Director, and in 2014 moved into Executive Director. Throughout her career at EPIC, Natalynne’s work held true to EPIC’s vision: maintaining healthy, connected forest ecosystems with sustainable and regenerative forest management practices. Among the work Natalynne will be remembered for, Natalynne built bridges will unconventional partners and long-time “adversaries,” recognizing that we can go further together. She worked with cannabis advocacy groups, other environmental organizations, and community leaders and elected officials in the growing industry throughout the development of the Humboldt Medical Marijuana Land Use Ordinance. After Humboldt’s ordinance passed, Natalynne developed organized the 2016 Cannabis Farmer’s Compliance Workshop series and the Farmer’s Compliance Handbook.

From everyone on the staff and Board of Directors, we wish Natalynne happy trails.

Tom Wheeler 2To take Natalynne’s place, Tom Wheeler is moving up to Executive Director.

Since Tom joined EPIC in 2014, he has brought a keen legal eye to EPIC’s work. Tom graduated from the University of Washington School of Law with a concentration in Environmental Law. Tom was President of the Environmental Law Society, served as Articles Editor of the Washington Journal of Environmental Law & Policy, and defended old-growth and endangered species at the Washington Forest Law Center. Tom was drawn to EPIC for its predominant “history of fighting and winning the fights no one thought possible.” Tom is excited to continue to bring his legal skills to work on protecting our wild places.

briana-vilalobosBriana Villalobos officially joined the EPIC staff in January as the Director of Communications and Development. So if you see a new face around, let Briana know you are excited about her joining the team!  Briana is responsible for energizing and engaging with the EPIC community. Her role is to work collaboratively with members and volunteers to organize events and provide resources and materials for membership development and enhancement.

Briana attended Humboldt State University where she earned her degree in sociology with an emphasis on human ecology. Her passion for environmental and social justice is exemplified by her time and research dedicated throughout her undergrad career, and as an intern for EPIC. She is fresh out of academia and is excited to further ignite her burning love for social activism and the environment.

We are pleased to enter this celebratory year with new faces, and exciting changes! However, as we carry on forward we must first acknowledge the tall tasks ahead of us. From climate change to the Trump administration, our North Coast ecosystems have never needed a vigorous advocate more than now. This year we will be on high alert, and continue to advocate for the sustainable management of public forests. The faces of EPIC are changing, but our heart remains the same. We have an exceptional staff of experts and support from a community of people who dare to think the world can be a better place. Together, we are powerful and together we will ensure California remains wild.


Grazing Reform Project Works Toward Responsible Grazing Practices

Wednesday, January 18th, 2017
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bigmdws_cattle-trail-in-wetlands-2EPIC is excited to announce the launch of the new website for our Project to Reform Public Land Grazing in Northern California, located at www.grazingreform.org. On the site you can access lots of information about the impacts of public land grazing, including 28 photo-illustrated reports which span the seven years during which Project volunteers have monitored and documented the manner in which livestock grazing, all by cattle, is being (mis)managed within 15 separate grazing allotments in wilderness areas and on other national forest lands within the Klamath, Rogue-Siskiyou and Shasta National Forests. If you like the work we are doing, please consider making a donation to the Project.  All donations will keep our intrepid grazing monitor, Felice Pace, out in the field documenting problems. We are also looking for volunteers to help perform grazing monitoring, in particular grazing allotments in the Mad River Watershed of the Six Rivers National Forest.

On the website you can access, read and download reports which document the poor manner in which public land grazing is managed and the resulting degradation of water quality, riparian areas and wetlands. On the site you can also access research on grazing impacts, best management practices for managing grazing, specialist reports, like the report of hydrologist Jonathan Rhodes on the Big Meadows Grazing Allotment in the Marble Mountain Wilderness, and several videos Felice and other Project volunteers have made in the field to highlight the negative impacts of grazing on riparian areas, wetlands, water quality and meadows.

Click here to donate to the grazing monitoring project

Click here to volunteer

A little background: 

The Project to Reform Public Land Grazing started over seven years ago in support of water quality testing by the Quartz Valley Indian Reservation (QVIR) in streams like Shakleford Creek and East Boulder Creek in the Scott River Basin. Using an environmental justice grant from the EPA, QVIR began testing water quality in streams issuing from grazing allotments within the Marble Mountain and Trinity Alps Wilderness Areas. QVIR testing documented violation of water quality standards for fecal coliform bacteria and excessive nutrients; both are associated with water pollution from poorly managed grazing.

Inspired by this QVIR effort, our project coordinator, Felice, decided to go onto the grazing allotments themselves to document the bad grazing management that resulted in the water pollution QVIR found and to use that information to advocate for improved grazing management. Over the past seven years, we’ve logged 1,210 hours monitoring grazing on-the-ground in our national forests—that’s over 150 person days of volunteer grazing monitoring!

While it is certainly impossible to eliminate all the negative impacts of grazing on water quality, riparian areas and wetlands, negative impacts within Northern California’s wet meadow headwaters could be substantially reduced if Forest Service managers would require that grazing permit holders implement modern grazing management methods, including regular herding to rotate grazing among the various pastures on an allotment. Presently, however, permit holders place their cattle on the public lands in the spring or summer and don’t return until mid to late October when the snow flies and cattle must be taken to the home ranch. Some grazing permit holders have become so lax that they do not even collect their cattle in the fall. Instead they allow their livestock to wander home on their own while continuing to graze on national forest land.

Allowing cattle to remain unmanaged on public land for months on end always leads to degraded water quality, trashed riparian areas and trampled wetlands. This is just one of the many instances of lax Forest Service grazing management which the project hopes to change. Trampled springs like the one in the photo below are a common sight on Northern California’s public land grazing allotments and a clear indicator of inadequate Forest Service grazing management.

Donate Now!

Sign up as a volunteer!


Bringing Back the Condor

Tuesday, January 17th, 2017
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800px-californcondor-scott-frierThe Yurok Tribe has spearheaded an effort in conjunction with the National Park Service and US Fish and Wildlife Service to establish a condor restoration program and release facility in Redwood National Park, to return condors to their historical range in Yurok Ancestral Territory, where they have not been seen for more than a century. We shouldn’t have to tell you this, but just in case: this is fantastic and EPIC wholeheartedly supports condor reintroduction. As part of the project, five public scoping meetings will be held this month in northern California and Oregon to receive input on the California Condor Restoration Plan/Environmental Assessment, including one in Eureka on January 26th.

Background

Since time immemorial, the Yurok Tribe has viewed the condor as a sacred animal, using their feathers and singing their songs in the World Renewal ceremony. As part of the Yurok Tribe’s obligation to heal the world, and return balance to Yurok Ancestral Territory, returning the condor to the region is spiritually and biologically imperative.

The California condor is the largest North American land bird primarily found in rocky shrub land, coniferous forests, and oak savannas. Condors are a keystone species, because their sharp beaks allow them to tear into tough skins of large mammalian carcasses that other scavengers cannot break down. Although fossil evidence shows that condors were once prevalent across North America, the end of the last glacial period reduced their range to the American Southwest and West Coast. In 1967 the species was federally listed as endangered, and in 1971 it was listed as an endangered species by the State of California. By 1987, habitat destruction, poaching and lead poisoning pushed wild condors into extinction, when all 22 remaining wild individuals were caught and put into captive breeding programs and in December 2015, the US Fish and Wildlife Service recorded a total population of 435 condors, consisting of 268 wild and 167 captive individuals.

Public Meetings

January 23: Sacramento, CA  6-8pm at the Federal Building, 2800 Cottage Way

January 24: Eureka, CA 6-8pm at the Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way

January 25: Klamath, CA 10am-12pm at the Yurok Tribal Office, 190 Klamath Blvd

January 25: Medford, OR 6-8pm at the Jackson County Auditorium, 7520 Table Rock Road, Central Point Oregon

January 26: Portland, OR 6-8pm at the Oregon Zoo, 4001 SW Canyon Road

How to Comment

Public scoping comments will be accepted until February 28, 2017 and can be submitted at the meetings or you can click here to submit comments online. Comments will be used to determine the scope of environmental issues and alternatives that will be addressed in the subsequent Environmental Assessment, which is scheduled to be released in summer of 2017. We encourage our members to support the program and highlight the importance of bringing the condor back to the Pacific Northwest by ensuring that the species has the habitat and protections necessary to reestablish their populations in the region.


Conservation Groups Challenge Permit to Pollute Elk River

Tuesday, January 17th, 2017
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Elk River Rd Flooding

Elk River Flooding. Photo courtesy of Elk River Resident’s Association

Pollution exacerbates flooding and ecosystem damage

EPIC and the North Group, Redwood Chapter Sierra Club filed a petition with the State Water Quality Control Board challenging last minute changes to a new permit issued by the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board to allow Humboldt Redwood Company to discharge sediment pollution into the Elk River, near Eureka.

On November 30, 2016, the Regional Board held a hearing on the permit. At the hearing, the Regional Board made numerous changes that effectively removed many key clean water protections and passed the order. The Regional Board’s actions not only frustrated public participation, but also violated state law by failing to provide adequate protections for the severely impaired Elk River.

“We need to ensure clean water and this decision doesn’t do that,” said Tom Wheeler, Program Director at EPIC. “In a controversial situation like this, where the government is permitting more pollution in an already degraded river, we need more public participation not less.”

The Elk River is the largest freshwater tributary to Humboldt Bay, flowing from its headwaters in the coastal mountains of Northwest California to Humboldt Bay. The majority of the Upper Elk River subwatershed is composed of steep (>35%) and easily erodible soils. Intensive logging by Pacific Lumber Co., beginning in 1986, left the weak and unstable slopes susceptible to sediment pollution from landsliding and surface runoff. In short time, the once clear Elk River filled with muck, infilling the river channel. This infilling has lessened the flow capacity of the river, meaning that during storm events, the river quickly floods. This flooding is more than a mere nuisance for residents of the Elk River watershed. Flooding has put lives at risk by closing important local roads and destroyed property, including homes.

Although Pacific Lumber Co. went bankrupt, issues in Elk River remain. Humboldt Redwood Co., which purchased land in the Elk River watershed from Pacific Lumber Co., continues to discharge sediment pollution, albeit in much smaller amounts. Humboldt Redwood Co. sought a permit from the Regional Board to allow further pollution. This permit, called a “waste discharge requirement,” has been in development for over a year and the public has been involved in its development.

In their petition for administrative review, EPIC and North Group, Redwood Chapter Sierra Club seek to remand the permit back to the Regional Water Quality Control Board with instructions to protect clean water and ensure public participation.

 

 


Gap Fire Report

Tuesday, January 17th, 2017
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Old-growth snag forests at the headwaters of Buckhorn Creek on the Siskiyou Crest are proposed for clearcut logging. Small snag patches like this one would be accessed with "temporary roads," tractor or skyline yarded, clearcut and replanted with plantations stands. Both snags and live trees would be cut. Photo courtesy of Luke Ruediger.

Old-growth snag forests at the headwaters of Buckhorn Creek on the Siskiyou Crest are proposed for clearcut logging. Small snag patches like this one would be accessed with “temporary roads,” tractor or skyline yarded, clearcut and replanted with plantations stands. Both snags and live trees would be cut. Photo courtesy of Luke Ruediger.

With recent snow on the ground, wildfire remains to be a hot topic. Headlines hype fire hysteria during summer months but no attention is paid to the extreme consequences of fire fighting. The necessary and beneficial effects to our forest ecosystems go unnoticed while a million dollars a day is being spent on putting them out. The monetary costs are easy to equate but the ecological costs are rarely publicized. To shed light on what takes place during and after a fire event, Luke Ruediger has put together a report of the Gap Fire that burned this summer on the Klamath National Forest.

Click here to get the full Gap Fire Report

The Gap Fire Report details day to day happenings of the military style of the fire industrial complex and highlights; significant weather events, fire severity and mosaic, impacts from past forest management on fire behavior, suppression impacts, fireline construction and rehabilitation, back-burning, retardant use, botanical impacts and the spread of noxious weeds, costs of fire suppression, the post-fire logging proposal and the importance of restorative fire management.


Three Victories for the Crown and Coast of California!

Tuesday, January 17th, 2017
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Lost Coast Headlands. Photo courtesy of Mark Harris

The Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument is expanded to 100,000 acres! Before leaving office, President Obama added 48,000 acres to the monument, which lies mostly in southwestern Oregon and now includes 5,000 acres in Northern California. The expansion will provide vital habitat connectivity and added landscape scale protection. The convergence of three geologically distinct mountain ranges, the Cascade, Klamath, and Siskiyous, has created a truly unique landscape, home to many rare and endemic plants and animals. It is the first monument set aside solely for the preservation of biodiversity.

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Trinidad Head. Photo courtesy of Mark Harris

The California Coastal National Monument now includes six new sites totaling over 6,230 acres. Three of them are in Humboldt County, Trinidad Head, Waluplh-Lighthouse Ranch and 440 acres of Lost Coast Headlands south of Eureka and the Eel River. The other areas include the 5,785-acre Cotoni-Coast Dairies parcel on the slopes of the Santa Cruz Mountains, Piedras Blancas lighthouse in San Luis Obispo County; and offshore rocks and small islands off the Orange County coast. The monument designation ensures the protection of all islets, reefs and rock outcroppings along the entire 1,100-mile long coastline of California within 12 nautical miles.

A recent Public Land Order has secured a 20-year Mineral Withdrawal just north of the state border in the Klamath Mountains. Covering 100,000 acres of land managed by the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest and Bureau of Land Management the order will protect some of the region’s most pristine rivers from large-scale strip mining and new mineral development, although it does not prohibit ongoing or future mining operations on valid pre-existing mining claims. The defining characteristic of the proposal is the Wild and Scenic North Fork of the Smith River, which originates in the Kalmiopsis Wilderness and runs through the South Kalmiopsis Roadless Area.

The crown of California, also known as the Siskiyou Crest, is an extremely ecologically important east to west biological corridor that straddles our neighboring state of Oregon. With the newly designated National Monument to the east and added protections for roadless lands to the west, the crown jewel of the state just got wilder! Together in combination with the addition of the culturally significant areas along the coast to monumental status is a real win for the people, plants and wildlife of our wild places.


BLM Seeking Input for Public Land Management in NW CA

Monday, January 9th, 2017
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The Bureau of Land Management will be holding public scoping meetings to seek comments to help shape the Northwest California Resource Management Plan (NCIMP) and Environmental Impact Statement for public land management over the next 15 to 20 years. The plan process is expected to take up to four years to complete and would govern 400,000 acres of public lands and resources in Del Norte, Siskiyou, Shasta, Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity, Tehama and Butte counties. Several meetings will be held throughout the region, including one in Eureka on Wednesday, January 11th at the Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center at 911 Waterfront Drive from 5 to 7 p.m. Other meetings will be held in Redding, Weaverville, Garberville, Willits, Chico and Yreka.

The planning area includes lands that are comprised of wilderness trails, hunting areas, off-highway riding areas, mountain bike trails and scenic vistas. Many of these lands provide habitat for fish and wildlife, as well as resource uses including mining, timber production, livestock grazing, and firewood collecting. Click here to find background documents that provide information about the planning area.

Specific areas of interest include Elkhorn Ridge, South Fork Eel River, Yolla Bolly, Middle Eel Ishi and Yuki Wilderness Areas as well as Samoa Dunes Recreation Area, Mike Thompson Wildlife Area, Lost Coast Headlands and Ma-l’el Dunes. We are urging our members to come out and advocate for habitat connectivity on these public lands as well as the protection of wildlife and vital ecosystems that could be affected by the plan.

We encourage our members to provide specific landscape-level comments and rationale including how you would like to see these places managed

Click here to comment and or find a meeting near you.


Public Land Giveaway

Monday, January 9th, 2017
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Sally Bell GroveOn the first day of Congress, the House of Representatives made it easier to give away public lands. In passing a “rules package”—the rules that are supposed to govern the rules for the 115th Congress—House Republicans included a provision that allows for the transferring of public lands without an accounting of the value that these lands provide.

Previously, rules required the Congressional Budget Office, a research arm of Congress, to determine how much a transfer would cost the U.S. Treasury by calculating the potential lost revenue from grazing fees or timber sales. Before a transfer could be approved, Congress would need to make budget cuts in other federal programs equivalent to the value of the land. The new rule change assumes that public lands are literally worthless, thereby eliminating the budgetary barrier to transfer land.

“It is alarming that giving away our public lands is apparently among the top priorities for this new Congress,” said Tom Wheeler, Program Director at EPIC. “Attempting to slip sneaky language into little-read legislation is not going to fly. We are watching.”

Our public lands are our nation’s key jewel, what filmmaker Ken Burns called, “America’s best idea.” Not only are our public lands a source of beauty and a backyard for recreation, they are key wildlife habitat and the source of clean drinking water. Public polling has shown that the vast majority of Americans are opposed to giving away our public lands, which helps to explain why Congress is trying to hide their actions in seemingly innocuous and mundane legislation.

Also worrisome, Trump’s pick for Secretary of the Interior, Rep. Ryan Zink (R-MT) voted for the rule change. Zink has previously stated that he is opposed to transferring ownership of federal lands to states, tribes, or private entities and his office said that, despite the vote, his position has not changed. To be fair, the land transfer provision was part of a larger rules package which included many other measures.


State Initiates Pilot Watershed Study of Timber Harvest Plan Process

Monday, January 9th, 2017
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The State of California has initiated the first of three planning watershed-scale pilot studies to evaluate the adequacy utility, and methods of representation and assessment of information that informs the modern-day Timber Harvest Plan review process. The Campbell Creek Planning Watershed Pilot Project is a subsidiary to the larger Timber Regulation and Forest Restoration Program that was created in the wake of 2012’s Assembly Bill 1492, that calls for ensuring efficiency, accountability, and transparency in the THP process, and the eventual development of “Ecological Standards and Performance Measures,” to ensure the overall effectiveness of the THP administration program.

The concept behind the Planning Watershed Pilot Project study is to evaluate pre-existing information in Timber Harvest Plans over history in a specific planning watershed and to then “truth” the value, utility, clarity, and representation of the information against the physical on-the-ground conditions in the watershed via field examination. The study will evaluate the ability of the information as represented to accurately depict field conditions, identify and design mitigation measures, and to identify restoration opportunities and prioritization of restoration activities and funds. The Planning Watershed Pilot Project study is the brain-child of long-time EPIC associate, Richard Gienger.

The Planning Watershed Pilot Project study for Campbell Creek, a tributary to the Ten Mile River in Central Coastal Mendocino County, is being conducted by the Planning Watershed Pilot Project Working Group. The Working Group is comprised of an agency leadership team, a team of agency technical staff, and an appointed group of non-governmental stakeholders, including land owners, Registered Professional Foresters, scientists, fisheries restorationists, environmental non-profits including EPIC, and a tribal liaison from the Pomo tribe. The concept of having “multi-disciplinary” team and approach to evaluation is critical to the premise of the pilot project concept.

Another, though understated objective of the Planning Watershed Pilot Project study, is to evaluate the ability of existing information in the THP process to inform and guide methods of assessment and develop necessary mitigations to address cumulative environmental impacts of past and contemporary timber harvesting activities on private lands in the State.

The Pilot Project Working Group held its first meeting in Fort Bragg in December 2016. The location allows for easy access to field site visits in the Campbell Creek watershed on its timberlands. Timberlands in Campbell Creek are presently primarily under the ownership of Lyme Timber. Lyme is a Timber Investment Management Organization (TIMO), and is the successor to Campbell Global, itself a TIMO. Campbell Global acquired the property from Georgia-Pacific Corporation. The Ten Mile River in Central Coastal Mendocino County is one of the last vestiges of remaining native wild-run coho salmon in the Central California Coast, and is thus a critical watershed for study and assessment of restoration opportunities.

The Planning Watershed Pilot Project study concept has been subject of other legislative efforts in the past that subsequently failed, but is now built into the rubric of the larger Timber Regulation and Forest Restoration Program, with the hope that the study will contribute valuable information to the larger program, and aid in the development of Ecological Standards and Performance Measures. Ecological Standards and Performance Measures can be thought of as “Thresholds of Significance,” in the CEQA parlance, a set of objectives and measureable criteria to aid in the identification and avoidance of adverse cumulative environmental impacts from timber harvest and related activities on private lands in the State.

EPIC’s participation in the Planning Watershed Pilot Project Working Group is a circling back to the landmark 1986 court decision, EPIC v. Johnson, in which EPIC sued CAL FIRE for approving the logging of old-growth in the Sally Bell Grove in what is now the Sinkyone Wilderness State Park, without evaluating the cumulative impacts of successive harvests and the subsequent cumulative loss of old-growth forests.

While EPIC prevailed in forcing private forestry to be subject to evaluation of cumulative impacts via the creation of the modern-day cumulative impacts assessment process in the Forest Practice Rules, the requirements are weak at best, and in the present-day have resulted in little more than cut-and-paste boiler-plate conclusionary statements that are passed off as an “evaluation,” to support a finding of no cumulative impacts. In the 30 years since EPIC v. Johnson, CAL FIRE has never denied a Timber Harvest Plan on the basis of a finding of adverse cumulative impacts, despite the wide-spread loss of old-growth, continued declines in populations of threatened and endangered fish and wildlife, the listing of almost every major North Coast stream as water quality impaired, and now the advent of global climate change.

Long-time EPIC associate, Richard Gienger, has been advocating for a truly multi-disciplinary evaluation of the THP process and the information upon which is predicated for decades, and his vision and prints are all over the concept and structure of the Planning Watershed Pilot Project study and the Planning Watershed Pilot Project Working Group. The Pilot Project study is a foundational element to building an understanding and developing an information-based critique of the current process, identifying opportunities for much-needed reform.

40 years, and still going strong, EPIC is working as hard as ever to protect our forests, fish, air, water and wildlife against the damaging impacts of industrial-scale timber harvest on private forestlands in the State. Far from being finished, EPIC will hang tough and stay strong and vigilant in working for the place we love and call home.