Archive for November, 2014

EPIC Evening at the Palm Dec. 6

Sunday, November 30th, 2014
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An EPIC Evening at The Palm, brings Eclectic Art, Sultry Jazz, Spicy Burlesque and a Cocktail Dance Party to the Historic Eureka Inn.

Burningleaf Productions is proud to present, An EPIC Evening at the Palm, a grand and swanky cocktail party fundraiser for the Environmental Protection Information Center. EPIC is dedicated to the protection and restoration of the forests of Northwestern California.

BadablingCome out in your glamour and glitz to sip some cocktails, enjoy eclectic art, listen to live jazz, be seduced by burlesque and dance the night away at the Palm lounge in the Historic Eureka Inn on December 6th. Hosted by the newly crowned “Mr. Humboldt”, Comedian, John McClurg, will entertain and enliven throughout night.

Start out the evening early and come celebrate Arts Alive! with a collaborative art show including four local artists exhibiting their works beginning at 7pm. Live music will the fill the air with a classy Jazz trio comprised of Brigette Brannan, Marcia Mendels and Chris Manspeaker .

DJ COPPERTON3 will bring the party to the next level at 9pm, as the audience prepares to be enraptured by Southern Humboldt’s Bada Bling! Burlesque. Bringing a sizzling array of performances to this intimate setting will certainly spice things up on this vivacious occasion.

DJ Jsun, founder of the Deep Groove Society will keep things shaking with his flirty and fluid house music. And to top the night off, everyone’s favorite Brazilian, DJ Marjo Lak brings a buttery bounce with her eclectic, tribal fusion, swinging house beats.

Tickets for an EPIC Evening at the Palm available at the door. Tickets will be on sale at the door at 518 7th St in Eureka for a sliding scale of $15-$25. Art Reception opens at 7pm with live jazz. Doors for Burlesque show & DJ’s 9pm. This is a 21 and over event. Special room rates offered at the Eureka Inn. Call (707)497-6093 to inquire. For more Information contact Jenny Metz at 707-223-3849 or burningleaf@asis.com.Epic Evening4.png


EPIC in Review

Monday, November 24th, 2014
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Redwood Tree Sit

As usual, EPIC is busy upholding environmental laws both at home, and across the nation. Over the past few months our staff has advocated for the protection of old growth in the Klamath National Forest, opposed the Federal Drought Bill and bad forestry bills, requested endangered species protections for monarch butterflies, requested action to protect families from harmful pesticides and submitted petitions on behalf of tens of thousands of people to protect wildlife and wild places. This list of documents is a sample of the many ways we engage with agencies and elected officials to make this world a better place, one issue at a time. Thank you to all of our members who take the time to make individual comments on these issues and for getting engaged with environmental protection on a deeper level. We are in regular contact with officials and it is clear that the agencies are listening and our comments are making a difference in the management of our natural resources.

Westside Scoping Comments – EPIC submitted substantive scoping comments to the Klamath National Forest on November 14, 2014.  The post-fire project proposes logging over 40,000 acres, of which 20,000 acres are within Late Successional Reserves.  Logging is also proposed in Wild and Scenic River Corridors, within watersheds critical for salmon recovery and within vital wildlife corridors.

Jess Petition – EPIC submitted 1,143 petition signatures to oppose logging old growth trees and vast forest canopy removal proposed on the North Fork Salmon River within the Klamath National Forest.  Thank you for taking action.

Sage Grouse Rider Letter – Supporting an amendment to strike the Sage-Grouse Endangerment Rider from the 2015 appropriations bill, which would delay federal protection for sage-grouse, and threaten efforts to protect their habitat.

Letter Opposing Senator Feinstein & Representative McCarthy’s “Federal Drought Bill” –  The bill directly undermines key statutory protections for fish, wildlife and groundwater protection, including water transfers from wildlife refuges and critical fish habitat of North Coast rivers.

Omnibus Letter – Encouraging committee on appropriations to pass a spending bill for the remainder of fiscal year 2015 that is free of policy riders that put polluting interests ahead of our air, water, lands, wildlife, public health and climate.

Nongame Fur Bearing Hunting Contest Comments EPIC submitted a petition containing 15,787 signatures to the California Fish and Game Commission in support of its proposed rulemaking to end inducements for hunting contests for nongame fur-bearing mammals.

Monarch Support Letter – Requesting support for that legal petition and protecting the monarch butterfly as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.

Letter to Governor Brown – Requesting that he take significant steps to protect California families from pesticides that have devastating consequences for children and their families.

Coalition Letter Opposing Bad Forestry Bills – The National Forest Jobs and Management Act of 2014 and the Restoring Healthy Forests for Healthy Communities Act pose a serious threat to environmental stewardship, public involvement, wildlife conservation and the rule of law in our National Forests.

Non-profit Letter to Water Board – Supporting the restoration of freshwater flows from the San Joaquin River and its tributaries to the estuary.

Letter to Chief of the U.S. Forest Service –  Supporting the Forest Service’s Community Forest and Open Space Conservation Program.

Organization Comments on “Effective Use of Programmatic NEPA Reviews” – Urging the Council to add clarification and direction in the final guidance making it clear that large-scale programmatic reviews without additional site-specific reviews are insufficient in the vast majority of cases.

Coalition Letter to Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board Regarding Land Retirement Benefits to Grasslands Bypass Project – Encouraging the retirement of 9,200 acres of irrigated land in the San Joaquin Delta, which would result in an estimated reduction of 14,000 acre feet of drainage, 92,000 tons of salt, 8,100 pounds of selenium and 282,000 pounds of boron discharges to aquifers and groundwater. This land retirement project would save water, prevent selenium contamination and reduce further impacts to endangered species.

Comment Letter to Forest Service Regarding  Proposed Rule Governing Use by Over-Snow Vehicles -Rrequesting that the final regulation protect resources, promote safety and minimize conflicts between other uses.

Passenger Pigeon Proclamation Request Letter – Requesting a presidential proclamation commemorating the centenary of the extinction of the passenger pigeon and reminding Americans of the need to be continued good stewards of wildlife and nature.


Giving Local Tuesday Dec. 2

Thursday, November 20th, 2014
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GivingLocalTuesdayEPICEPIC and the Northern California Association of Nonprofits have teamed up with several local organizations to bring Giving Local Tuesday to the north coast region. Taking place December 2, 2014 – the Tuesday after Thanksgiving – the Giving Tuesday campaign aims to harness the power of social media to create a national movement around the holidays dedicated to giving, similar to how Black Friday and Cyber Monday have become synonymous with holiday shopping. The organizations are seeking to inspire a spirit of generosity, personal philanthropy and greater levels of giving to local organizations during the holiday season.

“We need to cultivate our generosity out of appreciation for the services provided by nonprofits and out of reverence for the future of our community,” said Natalynne DeLapp, Executive Director of EPIC. “We all have a choice in how we spend our hard-earned money; during this season of thanks and generosity I encourage people to give to your local public interest organizations because you value and benefit from their missions, and because you believe in our collective ability to positively impact the world.”

The Northern California Association of Nonprofits includes more than one hundred local nonprofit organizations that provide key services to the community. Member organizations exist to solve social problems and advance important causes. Local nonprofits have genuine interests in making our communities better places to live, help create a vibrant arts and culture scene, work to protect the environment, defend human and civil rights, provide safety net services, and assure access to information in the form of public media.

“It is our hope that people across the region realize that they have the power to make significant differences in the community through their gifts to local organizations – whether that be through a donation of $5 or $5,000,” shared Amy Jester, NorCAN Program Manager. She continued, “Giving Local Tuesday is a fun way to inspire people to act and to encourage them to lovingly motivate their social networks to give money, time or needed resources.”

The Giving Tuesday movement was started in 2012. Seeing an opportunity to channel the generous spirit of the holiday season to inspire action around charitable giving, a group of friends and partners, led by the 92nd Street Y (92Y) in New York, came together to find ways to promote and celebrate the great American tradition of giving and the beginnings of the campaign were born. 92Y worked with partner organizations to harness the power of social media to create a national movement around the holidays dedicated to giving, similar to how Black Friday and Cyber Monday have become days that are, today, synonymous with holiday shopping. Local organizations have adopted the campaign with the twist of giving local.

“The retail industry has long benefited from seasonal shopping that symbolically kicks off with “Black Friday” – a day that has since inspired “Small Business Saturday” and “Cyber Monday.” Giving Tuesday, then, serves as a celebratory, fully connected day to kick off the giving season by making generous holiday and end-of-year charitable gifts,” said Denise Marshall, Director of the McLean Foundation. “The chance to give only begins with Giving Local Tuesday. We are encouraging people to think of the entire month of December as an opportunity to lend some year-end support to the numerous organizations that do such great work in our beloved community.”

“Giving is also good for businesses. “Positive community relationships as well as marketing opportunities can come from business participation in Giving Local Tuesday. It can also be a way to boost employee engagement, morale and team work,” said Fawn Scheer of Greenway Partners, an Arcata based consulting firm that operates The Link, a business incubator and collaboration space.

Maggie Kraft, Executive Director of Area 1 Agency on Aging explained, “We are participating in Giving Tuesday because coordinated giving efforts can have great impacts in communities,” she continued, “If you have money, please give, even if just a little. If you have time, there are so many ways to give it. It isn’t hard and it doesn’t hurt. Look around and just join in. Giving evokes gratitude, its contagious, and there have been several studies that show that giving is actually good for your health!”

Our goal at EPIC is to build upon the already strong culture of philanthropy to further strengthen the resiliency of the non-profit sector. If all groups become stronger, EPIC will become stronger and more capable. EPIC is focused on connecting working and wildland forests into whole healthy landscapes for flourishing nature and wildlife, in order to safeguard our valuable living resources in a changing climate for current and future generations. Click here to donate to EPIC.

For more information about Giving Local Tuesday, visit northerncalifornianonprofits.org


Advocate for Real Recovery

Wednesday, November 12th, 2014
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Take Action: The Klamath National Forest recently proposed a massive post-fire logging operation throughout some of the most important watersheds on the north coast. The Westside project targets up to 43,338 acres concentrated in Late-Successional Reserves (old forests), Riparian Reserves (streamside forests), in Wild and Scenic River corridors and within Northern spotted owl critical habitat.

This summer, fire burned through 200,000 acres of the Mid Klamath watershed, three-quarters of which were low to very low severity. While the fires burned—a necessary and important forest process in the Klamath Mountains—fire suppression efforts left a long-lasting mark on the landscape. Bulldozers marched through the forest creating wide and often ineffective firebreaks stacked with slash and denuding untold miles of ridgelines.

While the proposed cuts are bad in their own right, they are especially egregious in light of the recent past fires and intense fire suppression activities surrounding the Marble Mountain Wilderness Area. Further, there are past, present and proposed future timber sales throughout the region. The additional logging proposed in the Westside project would diminish crucial wildlife connectivity, like the Grieder Creek corridor that links contiguous habitat to and from the Marble Mountain Wilderness.

The Klamath National Forest is central to the Klamath/Siskiyou bioregion and is a treasure worth protecting. It is a biodiversity hot spot, supporting a wide variety of unique animals and plants including the endangered Northern spotted owl, Pacific fisher, Humboldt marten, and California wolverine. The cool, clean waters of the area protect California’s most robust salmon runs. Preserving intact forests in this region is also a local solution to climate change. The bioregion contains some of the highest biomass-dense forests in North America, sequestering carbon and storing carbon long after a fire.

Fire is a necessary component of healthy forest ecosystems. EPIC is currently engaging with the Klamath National Forest on a programmatic and project-by-project level to ensure sensible fire management. Post-fire logging is devastating for our wildlife, and wild places. The agency should engage with local community partners like the Western Klamath Restoration Partnership to work towards long-term fire strategies. Comments are due by November 14th. We need your help. Please help us advocate for real recovery.

Click here to take action now!

For more information on fire’s role in our forests and the harmful effects of post-fire logging, please visit our website.


Fall Celebration Thank You

Tuesday, November 11th, 2014
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Fall Celebration Dinner 2014

On Friday, November 7th, several hundred North Coast community members celebrated 37 years of forest and wildlife protection with EPIC at their annual Fall Celebration. The staff and board of EPIC would like to thank all of the community members, volunteers and businesses that made it possible to throw an incredibly entertaining and successful event!

A HUGE thank you to Chef Luke Patterson, owner of The Other Place for designing and coordinating the Farm to Table Dinner. Friends and neighbors shared an exceptionally prepared and locally sourced feast, much of which was donated by Humboldt County farmers, while listening to the musical stylings of singer-songwriter Joannne Rand. Dave Bergin owner of Bergin-Siplia Winery and Lina Carro owner of Violet-Green Winery provided an amazing selection of wines to complement the evening’s dinner offerings.

David and Ellen Drell, founders of the Willits Environmental Center, received EPIC’s 2014 Sempervirens Award to honor their lifetime achievement in environmental activism. The Drells are best known for their efforts opposing Caltrans’ Willits Bypass, they are also lifelong forest protectors and wilderness advocates who successfully campaigned to add more than 140,000 acres of forest into the Federal Wilderness System. David and Ellen are an inspiration to us at EPIC for their commitment to the community, and to each other—thank you for all of you do for the planet!

Thank you to the Bay Area’s HOUSE OF FLOYD who rocked the house with an elaborate concert and laser show that immersed the audience in the atmospheric authenticity of light and sound of the original Pink Floyd. Thank you to KMUD for providing airtime and publicity for the event. We thank all of our volunteers who worked tirelessly on this event, and we really can’t thank them enough. They came early, stayed late, worked with aching feet, scrubbed dishes, helped raise money, contributed money, and did their absolute best to make our event wonderful while keeping smiles on their faces even after ridiculously long hours. A special thank you to Kelly Karaba for emceeing the event with style and grace; and congratulations to EPIC’s 2014 Volunteer of the Year, Kellie St. James, for her willingness to tackle any task with enthusiasm.

We are profoundly grateful for the financial and emotional support of our community who keeps EPIC strong and healthy. As we move forward into 2015 and beyond, we will work together to create a healthy and connected forested ecosystem with clean air, ample cold water, abundant native flora and fauna and to ensure our quality of life for now and for future generations.


Joanne Rand Band CD Release & EPIC Benefit Bash Nov. 13

Tuesday, November 11th, 2014
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Joanne RandThe Environmental Protection Information Center is proud to present the Joanne Rand Band at the Arcata Playhouse on Thursday, November 13th! Come experience one of our region’s finest independent artists of psychedelic-folk revival and support EPIC’s work to protect the forest ecosystems of the North Coast. Doors open at 7:00 and music starts at 7:30. Tickets will be $8-15 at the door, and all proceeds will benefit the amazing landscape we cherish, as well as, people working together to protect the forests that make the north coast so special. Spirits and delicious snacks will be available. Call the EPIC office at 707-822-7711 for more information or click here to visit the event page on Facebook!

Joanne Rand Band EPIC Poster


Jess Say No—Take Action to Save Forest Canopy and Wildlife Trees

Monday, November 10th, 2014
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Take Action: The Jess timber sale would remove vast amounts of forest canopy, disturb riparian reserves and targets old growth and mature wildlife trees within Critical Habitat for the Northern spotted owl. The project would cut nearly 1,000 acres of north facing slopes within the North Fork Salmon River watershed on the Klamath National Forest, adding to the cumulative effects of 45,000 acres of wildfire, extreme impacts from firefighting and post-fire logging from the 2013 Salmon Complex Fire.

The Wild and Scenic North Fork Salmon River is one of the most important rivers for the last remaining wild-run of spring Chinook salmon and contains habitat vital to rare and threatened species. These north facing native stands offer cool microclimates that contain precious remnants of older trees and are generally less susceptible to severe fire events. Removing 70% of the forest canopy, as proposed would be detrimental to wildlife and would increase fire behavior in the long-term.

The recently released Draft Environmental Impact Statement did not consider the massive impacts from recent two years of fire activity. Nearly the entire road system in North Fork watershed has seen considerable traffic from large trucks and heavy equipment. The prolonged high-use of roads has caused sediment to flow into creeks throughout the watershed. In the Jess project area, approximately twenty miles of ridge top fire lines were bulldozed to bare earth during the 2014 Whites Fire and are now covered in slash. Further, wet weather post-fire logging has occurred roughly 1,000 acres of steep erodible hillsides directly across the river.

The Jess DEIS did not consider the newly proposed Westside post-fire project introduced by the agency last month, which targets up to 43,883 acres of fragile post-fire habitat throughout the Klamath National Forest. Within the Whites Fire footprint, directly across the river, 7,600 acres of Late Successional (mature trees) Reserves, Riparian Reserves and the North Fork Salmon Wild and Scenic River corridor are threatened.

Please urge Klamath National Forest decision makers to protect our wildlife and wild places and to work proactively and collaborate with local communities, partnerships, watershed restoration and fire safe councils to create an alternative that would follow the recommendations in the Salmon River Community Wildfire Protection Plan and would accomplish fuels reduction, forest health and fire resiliency objectives in a way that retains forest values.

Click here to sign a petition now!

Or submit your own comments through the Forest Service Portal November 17th.

Dozer lines in the proposed Jess timber sale project area from the 2014 Whites Fire

Canopy removal with leave tree mark- all trees not marked with orange would be cut

Jess Project forest stands

Wildlife trees